Impact Report: Extension Gardening Team

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Extension Gardening Team Download as PDF By The Numbers 62 publications produced in 5 years 1 web site developed 1 listserv created 1 blog administered 16 counties representing 60% of Washington’s population (2010 census) 2016 Issue

Anyone with an Internet connection and a computer can post gardening information. The problem is that much of it is anecdotal. In 2011, Washington State University (WSU) administrators identified a lack of current, relevant, and peer-reviewed information available to home gardeners. Due to earlier budget cuts, the number of statewide discipline experts writing such content had fallen sharply. At best, county-based … » More …

Impact Report: Beef Tenderness

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Beef Tenderness Download as PDF In Search of the Perfect Steak By The Numbers 5 cooperating producers participated. Project included 350 cattle over 12 years of data collection. 66% of grass-finished beef is considered “tough.” 25% of commercial beef is considered “tough.” American Beef Council reports a guaranteed tender product is worth an additional $352 per carcass. (2008) 2016 Issue

American beef is of high quality, but tenderness is a concern. In national studies “grass-fed” beef is considered tough 66% of the time by consumers. Additionally, consumers believe “normal” beef is less than desirable tenderness 23% of … » More …

Impact Report: First Detector/Exotic Pest Team

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First Detector/Exotic Pest Team Download as PDF By The Numbers

Since 2013:

12,599 gardeners, landscapers, farmers, and natural resource professionals have been trained to recognize key exotic pests and manage newly introduced pests. 141 first detector workshops and exotic pest educational events have been delivered. 10 pieces of scholarship have been produced along with 8 training modules. 4 grants have supported team efforts to recruit WSU clientele and program participants to detect exotic pests.

Since 1991:

67 new invertebrate state records, 15 a direct result of WSU outreach efforts. 2016 Issue

Yearly economic … » More …

Impact Report: Farm to Fork Field Day Program

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Farm to Fork Field Day Program

By The Numbers

Over 2 seasons of Farm to Fork Field Trips:

  • 1,025 youth participated
  • 20 field day events were held
  • 10 elementary schools, 3 with multiple grades, attended the program
  • 5 youth community groups participated
  • 23% visited a farm for the 1st or 2nd time
  • 81% increased their ability to make a difference by helping harvest food for the hungry
  • 4,000+ pounds of carrots, squash, and cucumbers were harvested for distribution at the Clark County Food Bank

2016

Issue

Washington State University Extension programs have promoted healthy living through a variety of delivery methods for individuals and families for more than 100 years. Today, health issues continue to be significant to youth and families in our state. In Washington, 24% of youth ages 10-17 and 27% of adults are overweight or obese (Department of Health, 2013). There is a strong need for people to identify the health benefits of increasing fruit and vegetable consumption and recognize the bigger picture of food systems. Putting food on the table is not only an experience that begins at the grocery store. It is important to understand that it grows locally and each person can be involved in its production and/or finding more of it locally. This is especially critical in urban settings where people are farther removed from the production of their own food. Teaching and showing youth where their food comes from and how it gets to their table can influence their desire to increase their local selection of produce for a healthy diet.

Agricultural literacy is an important way to encourage healthy eating behaviors through education about food systems. Pairing this with hands-on activities involving growing food increases the chances youth will make changes in their food choices.

Response

In an effort to connect youth to local food access and help them understand where their food comes from, 4-H and Food $ense have worked together to develop the WSU Clark County Extension’s Farm to Fork Field Days. This field trip experience gives youth the opportunity to visit the Heritage Farm and learn about local food access.

In 2014, the WSU Clark County Extension faculty, staff, and volunteers worked together to pilot the Farm to Fork Field Day program. The goal was to increase the awareness and knowledge of agriculture and the role it plays in the lives of young people in Clark County. Through Farm to Fork, area youth from schools and community groups came to the Heritage Farm to learn more about how their food grows and gets to their tables at home.

Since the pilot project, Farm to Fork has been promoted in school classrooms and community youth programs encouraging youth to participate in hands-on farm experiences. Groups participate in farm- and food-topic-related workshop stations. The topics of these stations include: planting, weeding, and harvesting produce, worm composting, water resources, bees and pollination, uses of animals and animal byproducts, food systems, and other farm-based activities. » More …

Impact Report: Wheat Academy

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Wheat Academy

By The Numbers

  • 75 attendees (50 crop consultants and 25 growers).
  • Presentations on 12 dryland crop production issues.
  • 95% of 2014 academy participants used information on soil/herbicide interactions, which impacted 696,152 acres.
  • 91% used information on wheat development and growth, impacting 673,112 acres.
  • 91% used information on soil acidity, impacting 153,861 acres.
  • 85% used information on micronutrient dynamics in soils and plants, impacting 135,010 acres.

2016

Issue

Growers make a lot of decisions during the growing season, including what crop to plant, what crop varieties to use, what pest control strategies to use, how much fertilizer they need and when to apply it, and when to sell their grain. Educational events for this audience had been poorly coordinated and often lacked informational depth.

Dryland crop production in eastern Washington is a challenging enterprise and knowledge is necessary for success.

Response

The Extension Dryland Cropping Systems Team formed in 2013 to efficiently coordinate and deliver non-biased, research-based educational information and resources to dryland crop producers in eastern Washington. As part of its efforts the team created the Wheat Academy in 2014. The second Wheat Academy occurred at Washington State University on December 15-16, 2015. Attendance was limited to 75 people to keep class size small enough to allow for quality, hands-on activities. Fifty spots were reserved for crop consultants and 25 for growers. Presentations included information on:

  • Understanding the mechanisms of herbicide resistance;
  • Variety development of wheat cultivars in the Pacific Northwest;
  • The nitrogen cycle in the soil-plant-atmosphere system, what happens to nitrogen fertilizers after application, and how form, timing, and rate of nitrogen application, tillage, and residue management affect yield and protein;
  • Monitoring soil pH and implementing a liming program;
  • Differences between wheat and canola management, and the best strategies for a successful transition to growing canola based on current research;
  • Wheat price formation and the potential benefits/challenges of actively managing price risk;
  • Nutrient content and the value of wheat and other crop residue;
  • Crop rotation;

» More …