Impact Report: Resilient Families Inside Out

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Resilient Families Inside Out

2016

By The Numbers

As of July 15, 2016:
• 111 inpatient participants.
• 71 inpatients completed 20+ program hours, 45 were parents.
• Participants averaged 28 years of age.
• Mean program satisfaction rating is 4.25 on 5-point likert scale.

Overall:
• A 6-member team of parenting education and yoga instructors delivers the program.
• $169,705 in grants and sponsorships have supported delivery of more than 15 intensive 16-to-24- hour programs to more than 760 participants, including 460 treatment center inpatients.
• FFSFIO/RFIO programs have been presented at 6 national and 4 state conferences, in addition to 13 local presentations.

Building resiliency in parents, adults, and families through parenting education and mindfulness for high-risk audiences

Issue

Addiction-related issues in the United States cost an estimated $524 billion annually in productivity, health, and crime-related incidents, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Drug addiction researchers and practitioners identify addiction as a developmental disease, and recognize the significance of the quality of parent-child relationships and children’s social adjustment to addiction. Family relationship circumstances are also one of the “central eight” predictive risk factors for criminal behavior. Along those lines, in 2008, local assessments identified drug use and a concern for parents’ coping strategies as prevalent community issues.

Individuals with substance use disorders along with other high-risk audiences particularly benefit from parenting education interventions that effectively address stress management and emotional regulation, and emphasize repairing and building healthy and strong parent-child relationships. WSU Extension, other professionals, and families in an ever-changing economic climate require new collaborative strategies to meet parenting education needs. Local organizations welcomed innovative programming and delivery methods to address these issues.

Response

Resilient Families Inside Out (RFIO) is a parenting education prevention/intervention program that cultivates resiliency. Participants cultivate their internal resilience or well-being by increasing their knowledge of parenting and learning stress-management practices. The program’s goals are to prevent child abuse and neglect, and to increase healthy coping strategies and healthy parenting practices.

Participants, through parenting education, mindfulness, and yoga instruction, increase their capacity for assimilating new patterns of thought and behaviors to reduce risks for future abuse to self or others. Participants build parental resilience by increasing self-awareness and emotional regulation, and by learning and applying what they learn about child development, setting limits, communication, and promoting balance in themselves and their families.

RFIO first started in the Chelan County Regional Jail in 2009 as a program for incarcerated fathers, then called Fit Fathers, Successful Families, Inside & Out (FFSFIO). The program expanded delivery to the general community and to drug and alcohol treatment inpatients in 2010 and grew to become the Resilient Families Inside Out (RFIO) program in 2013. » More …

Impact Report: Latina Total Wellbeing

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Latina Total Wellbeing Download as PDF By The Numbers 358 participants (356 women and 2 men) attended one of 5 eight-week series in 2015 and 2016. 100% of participants expressed interest in learning English. About 50% want to learn more about starting a small business. About 80% are interested in financial support (grants, loans) for a potential small business. 8 women enrolled in GED classes as a result of the workshops. 32 women enrolled in financial education classes. 34 women enrolled in First Steps Series, a business development course through the Center for Inclusive Entrepreneurship at Pinchot … » More …

Impact Report: Ideas for Healthy Living

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Ideas for Healthy Living

By The Numbers

  • Provided 53 health and wellness classes, 18 food preparation demonstrations, 7 community events, and 3 diabetes prevention series.
  • Provided 212 hours of facilitated learning to individuals throughout Skagit County.

In 2015 IFHL program efforts reached wide and diverse audiences by:

  • Demonstrating more than 20 different nutritious recipes in Skagit County to low-income audiences using local, seasonal food.
  • Providing health and wellness classes to more than 400 individuals in the community.
  • Engaging 33 individuals at risk for developing type 2 diabetes in the Center for Disease Control Diabetes Prevention Program.
  • Promoting physical activity and healthy hydration to more than 1,000 individuals with interactive displays including our “Blender Bike/Re-Think Your Drink” display and “Eating A Rainbow of Color” display and presentation.

2016

Issue

The health and well-being of a changing society is a critical concern for Skagit County and lack of access to healthy food is one contributing factor to the health status of community members. A recent community health needs assessment identified excessive weight, obesity, and improving nutrition (fruit and vegetable consumption) as priorities. While the Skagit Valley is a rich agricultural area, access to food is difficult for many county residents. It is estimated that 1 in 9 households experience food insecurity, including the 27% of households with children who struggle to put food on the table. The Department of Health chronic disease profile of Skagit County reports that 27% of adults, and 13% of 10th graders are overweight. Only 25% of adults consume the recommended 5-9 servings of fruits and vegetables per day, and just 1 in 10 youth report eating more than 1 serving of fruits and vegetables daily.

Response

The Ideas for Healthy Living (IFHL) program at Skagit County WSU Extension has designed interactive learning experiences for each step along the consumer food pathway – selection and purchase, growing and harvesting, preparing and cooking, storage and waste reduction, and movement and physical activity. Choosing healthy foods no matter where someone shops, whether at the supermarket, corner store, farmers market or food bank, is promoted through supermarket tours, recipe tastings, and educational displays. Culinary skills needed to prepare easy and delicious meals are presented in small, group classes for young and old alike. A food safety and food preservation advice phone line, instructional classes, and handouts present best-practices for preserving food, and information on how to reduce food waste and incidence of food-borne illness. Promoting healthy habits to reduce the risk of chronic disease and help maintain a healthy weight occurs in small, group meetings, after-school programs, early learning centers, and at health fairs. Skagit County WSU Extension incorporates best-practice theory in interactive learning that is engaging and meaningful to participants. Additionally:

  • Parents, childcare providers, and preschool teachers learn proper food portions and nutrition tips for preschoolers to support the development of positive eating habits for preschoolers and youth;
  • Food bank shoppers learn how to select and prepare items available at the food pantry through educational displays and recipe demonstrations;
  • Older adults and seniors adopt new strategies for meal planning and physical activity with the support of  a  lifestyle coach in the Diabetes Prevention Program;

» More …

Impact Report: Farm to Fork Field Day Program

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Farm to Fork Field Day Program

By The Numbers

Over 2 seasons of Farm to Fork Field Trips:

  • 1,025 youth participated
  • 20 field day events were held
  • 10 elementary schools, 3 with multiple grades, attended the program
  • 5 youth community groups participated
  • 23% visited a farm for the 1st or 2nd time
  • 81% increased their ability to make a difference by helping harvest food for the hungry
  • 4,000+ pounds of carrots, squash, and cucumbers were harvested for distribution at the Clark County Food Bank

2016

Issue

Washington State University Extension programs have promoted healthy living through a variety of delivery methods for individuals and families for more than 100 years. Today, health issues continue to be significant to youth and families in our state. In Washington, 24% of youth ages 10-17 and 27% of adults are overweight or obese (Department of Health, 2013). There is a strong need for people to identify the health benefits of increasing fruit and vegetable consumption and recognize the bigger picture of food systems. Putting food on the table is not only an experience that begins at the grocery store. It is important to understand that it grows locally and each person can be involved in its production and/or finding more of it locally. This is especially critical in urban settings where people are farther removed from the production of their own food. Teaching and showing youth where their food comes from and how it gets to their table can influence their desire to increase their local selection of produce for a healthy diet.

Agricultural literacy is an important way to encourage healthy eating behaviors through education about food systems. Pairing this with hands-on activities involving growing food increases the chances youth will make changes in their food choices.

Response

In an effort to connect youth to local food access and help them understand where their food comes from, 4-H and Food $ense have worked together to develop the WSU Clark County Extension’s Farm to Fork Field Days. This field trip experience gives youth the opportunity to visit the Heritage Farm and learn about local food access.

In 2014, the WSU Clark County Extension faculty, staff, and volunteers worked together to pilot the Farm to Fork Field Day program. The goal was to increase the awareness and knowledge of agriculture and the role it plays in the lives of young people in Clark County. Through Farm to Fork, area youth from schools and community groups came to the Heritage Farm to learn more about how their food grows and gets to their tables at home.

Since the pilot project, Farm to Fork has been promoted in school classrooms and community youth programs encouraging youth to participate in hands-on farm experiences. Groups participate in farm- and food-topic-related workshop stations. The topics of these stations include: planting, weeding, and harvesting produce, worm composting, water resources, bees and pollination, uses of animals and animal byproducts, food systems, and other farm-based activities. » More …

Impact Report: Strengthening Families

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Strengthening Families

2016

By The Numbers

  • The Strengthening Families Program has reached 5,228 families regionally.
  • Facilitators have delivered more than 578 seven-week workshops, serving more than 7,600 youth statewide and regionally.
  • Since 2001, WSU Extension faculty have trained more than 800 program facilitators.
  • 51 counties in Washington, Oregon, and Nevada participate in Strengthening Families Programs.
  • Washington is expected to save $17 million due to this program’s impacts to date.

Reducing risky teen behavior by building family strengths – engaging communication, fun, and understanding.

Issue

Substance abuse is a serious and costly problem in Washington and nationwide. In a 2012 survey by the Washington Department of Social and Health Services, 23% of 10th graders in Washington said they had been drunk in the past 30 days, and one in five had driven while drinking.

Families are important sources of support and guidance for children, and the welfare of children often is tied to the strength of their families. Strong family relationships promote healthy development and protect against teen substance use.

While there is lots of good information for parents of younger children and for teenagers, there is very little information about parenting children from ages 10 to 14, who are transitioning from childhood to adolescence. This is a risky period, and it is difficult for parents to accommodate their children’s growing need for autonomy while still monitoring their behavior and keeping them safe.

Response

The WSU Extension Parenting team did a needs assessment and identified parents of children in this transitional developmental stage as underserved.

The award-winning Strengthening Families Program for Parents and Youth Aged 10-14, is a parent, youth, and family skills-building curriculum that focuses on strengthening parenting skills, building family strengths, and preventing teen substance abuse and other behavioral problems. The Strengthening Families Program (SFP) strives to improve parental nurturing and limit-setting skills, improve communication skills for parents and youth, and encourage youth pro-social skills development.

The program is seven weeks long. Each weekly session typically includes a group snack or meal, followed by separate workshops for parents and children, then family activities that encourage communication and closeness. Parents learn and rehearse best-practice parenting skills; youth learn peer-resistance skills, and how to understand and empathize with their parents’ concerns. » More …

Tagged
YF

Germ City

A science-based education program to improve the effectiveness and frequency of hand washing behaviors in adults and children.

Nutrition Education

The Nutrition Education Network of Washington is a strategic alliance of agencies and organizations that work with low-income families. The Network’s objective is to coordinate nutrition education efforts to communicate consistent, positive and relevant messages to increase awareness of healthful and enjoyable eating.