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Grapevine Leafroll Disease

Grapevine Leafroll Disease

EB2027E
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Naidu Rayapati, Sally O'Neal, Douglas Walsh
Grapevine leafroll is a very complex viral disease. This publication addresses various aspects of disease symptoms, accurate diagnosis, vector management, and the absolute necessity of taking preventive measures.

Among the virus and virus-like diseases infecting grapevines worldwide, grapevine leafroll disease is considered to be the most economically destructive. It is a major constraint to the production of premium wine grapes in Washington State and, indeed, throughout the Pacific Northwest region.

This publication and the research behind it was supported, in part, with an Extension Issue-focused Team internal competitive grant funded in part from the Agriculture Program in WSU Extension and the Agricultural Research Center in the College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences, Washington State University. The authors also acknowledge the Northwest Center for Small Fruits Research, the Washington State Department of Agriculture, the WSU New Faculty Seed Grant Program, the Washington State Commission on Pesticide Registration, and industry members of the Wine Advisory Committee of the Washington Wine Commission for their support of research presented in this project. We are grateful to Ken Eastwell, Pete Jacoby, Rick Hamman, and Frank Zalom for their valuable editorial assistance.
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GLD in WA vineyards

Wine grapevines Vitis vinifera L. are susceptible to a broad range of plant viruses—nearly sixty among twenty different genera. That’s more than any other perennial fruit crop. Among the virus and virus-like diseases infecting grapevines worldwide, grapevine leafroll disease (GLD) is considered to be the most economically destructive. It accounts for an estimated 60% of yield losses due to virus diseases in grape production worldwide.

The Crop Profile for Wine Grapes in Washington (MISC0371E), published in 2003 (http://wsprs.wsu.edu/CropProfiles.html), estimated that GLD affected just under 10% of the state’s wine and juice grape acreage, but GLD incidence seems to be increasing across the state in recent years. Today, GLD is considered a major constraint to the production of premium wine grapes in Washington State. This publication presents the latest research findings and recommendations regarding GLD directed toward the wine grape growers and certified nurseries of Washington State.

GLD is a stealthy foe. It is difficult to recognize. Symptoms express differently among various cultivars and they don’t show up until the growing season is well underway. Sometimes there are no visual symptoms at all. Making matters worse, other conditions may result  in symptoms that mimic GLD.

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