Value Added Processing for Entrepreneurs Seminar

Program Contact: Nils Johnson, Extension Coordinator
(509) 684-2588 • nils.johnson@wsu.edu

     NEW: Due to popular demand this event is now being offered also as a live webinar!
     See below for details.

Do you have a delectable food product that you’d like to manufacture for sale? Thinking of processing produce from your farm to sell through the winter season? Maybe frozen corn for the school district or grandma’s pickled garlic to sell at the farmers market? Wonder what it takes to develop your own commercial kitchen or looking for options to rent a facility?

The Community Agriculture Development Center (CADC) in Colville WA is pleased to announce Value Added Processing for Entrepreneurs, a seminar hosted by WSU Stevens County Extension. This seminar occurring April 17th from 1:00 – 5:00 PM will provide the information you need.

 

Event Details
When: Monday, April 17th, 1:00 – 5:00 PM
Where: WSU Stevens County Extension, 986 S. Main, Colville WA
Cost: Free, but space is limited so please call or email to register
Agenda: http://extension.wsu.edu/stevens/agriculture/
Contact: Nils Johnson, nils.johnson@wsu.edu, (509) 684-2588

 

This seminar will demystify what it takes to add value to fresh fruits and vegetables by processing them into pickles, jams, frozen chunks, etc. to sell. “The instructors we have lined up from WSU and the WSDA for this seminar are real experts” says Jim Noetzelman, President of the CADC. “It’s a great opportunity for anyone interested in processing food for sale to get their questions answered by friendly and approachable industry professionals with immense experience helping food entrepreneurs be successful.”

Come get the information needed to start (or further develop) a value added food product. Learn about the product development process, complying with food safety regulations, and hear about the processing facility recommendations resulting from the CADC Food Processing Facility Feasibility Study.

A value added product is any higher value product that has been produced using raw or lower value ingredients. Examples of value added food products include items such as strawberry-jalapeno jam, dilly beans, spiced ketchup, frozen cut melon, huckleberry ice cream, dried apple slices, curried lentil soup mix, frozen cherry pies and jarred pie filling, etc.  Any food product which has been processed before being sold is a value added product.

Value added processing in rural communities is viewed by many as an opportunity for farmers to capture a larger portion of dollars consumers spend on processed food items while making it more convenient for consumers to eat local.

(see Calendar Entry here)

Seminar Agenda

(1:00 – 2:00)
Instructor – Girish Ganjyal, WSU Extension
– Industry overview and how a typical food product business develops

        • Product Concept and Kitchen/Lab Scale Product Development

(2:00 – 2:30 PM)
Instructor – Girish Ganjyal, WSU Extension
– Information on the process of going from idea to successful product

        • Break with refreshments available

(2:30 – 2:45)

        • Safety and Safety Regulation
        • FDA & Food Safety Modernization Act Overview

(2:45 – 3:00 PM)
Instructor – Girish Ganjyal, WSU Extension
– What’s in a Food Safety Plan
– What a HACCP plan is and when you need one

(3:00 – 3:05 PM)
Instructor – Nils Johnson

(3:05 – 3:45 PM)
Instructor – Claudia Coles, WSDA

– What your kitchen needs to be a licensed Processing Facility

– What goes into your WSDA Food Processing Application

(4:00 – 4:30 PM)
Instructor – Nils Johnson, WSU Stevens County Extension
– Summary of CADC Food Processing Facility Feasibility Study Results

        • Questions & Answers

(4:30 – 5:00 PM)

 

Webinar Information

Please join this event from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
…This meeting was held in the past…

You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (312) 757-3121

Access Code: 389-278-629

First GoToMeeting? Try a test session: http://help.citrix.com/getready

 

This seminar is made possible by funding from a Specialty Crop Block grant through the Washington State Department of Agriculture.