Impact Report: 4-H Rite of Passage

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4-H Rite of Passage Download as PDF Successfully Claiming Adulthood By The Numbers More than 45 educational partners locally and internationally. Since 2003, 4-H Rite of Passage has mentored and safely guided an estimated 140 youth through their transitions to adulthood. There are approximately 75 adults in a queue to become 4-H Rite of Passage guides. 2016 Issue

A vital question of any culture is how youth are prepared to take on the identity of a mature individual. Positive mentoring relationships have been shown to have a healthy effect on life trajectories and outcomes. … » More …

Impact Report: 4-H National Youth Science Day

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4-H National Youth Science Day

Learning by Doing

By The Numbers

  • 25 counties in Washington coordinated events for youth to participate in National Youth Science Day in a variety of settings including, classrooms, afterschool programs, special events, and club meetings.
  • Faculty, staff, volunteers, and teen leaders reached more than 4,000 youth through the National Science Experiment in 2015.
  • 12 counties received financial support from a National Mentoring Grant to implement National Youth Science Day events.
  • 11 counties received support from Avista Foundation to provide hands-on learning for youth engaged in the National Youth Science experiment.
  • Colville Reservation Extension 4-H has participated in all 8 of the National Youth Science Day events since 2008!

2016

Issue

Our nation is falling behind other countries in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Participation in high-quality positive youth development programs offers youth and adults the opportunity to engage in scientific exploration and work together to build the next generation of our nation’s scientists, engineers, and mathematicians.

Today the U.S. ranks 27th among developed nations with college students receiving science or engineering degrees. Only 1% of 4th graders, 2% of 8th graders, and 1% of high school seniors are deemed “advanced” in science. Only 45% of high school graduates in 2011 were ready for college work in math, and 30% in science.

A recent longitudinal study conducted by Tufts University, The Positive Development of Youth: Comprehensive Findings from the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development, revealed 4-H programming gets young people more connected to science. 4-H’ers are two times more likely to take part in science programs outside of school. Consistent with the Tuft’s study, Washington State 4-H Youth Development program is engaged in promoting STEM learning opportunities for youth by offering diverse hands-on learning experiences that explore the sciences.

Response

Since 2008, National 4-H Council has led the way in a rallying event to bring together youth and volunteers across the nation to simultaneously complete a National Science Experiment during National 4-H Week in October. WSU 4-H has engaged youth throughout the state in taking on the challenge to participate in the annual science experiment. The experiments not only have introduced various science and engineering challenges, but also have engaged learners in strategies to address real world problems. Experiments focusing on protecting the environment and learning skills to be savvy consumers have increased interest in STEM learning and inspired youth to ask critical questions.

The 2015 National Science Experiment, Motion Commotion, explored the science of motion through the relationship of speed and stopping distance. The experiment extended to a real-world investigation on reaction time and safety, making connections to the dangers of distracted driving. Youth used a toy car, a figure made of modeling clay, and a ramp to observe collisions, to investigate the physical factors of motion and what influences a car’s ability to stop. They learned about Newton’s Laws of Motion and how to measure speed. Teens and volunteer leaders facilitated the experiment with youth in grades 4 and above and engaged them in activities to explore how distractions such as cell phones can influence reaction time and safety.

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Impact Report: 4-H SeaTech

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4-H SeaTech Download as PDF Leaders in Washington 4-H STEM By The Numbers More than 60% of SeaTech 4-H club members reported doing better in science and math at school as a result of joining SeaTech. 91% feel that being a member of SeaTech 4-H helped them have a better understanding of science. 71% said they were motivated to take more science classes after they joined SeaTech 4-H.   74% of survey respondents entered into, or planned to enter into, a science, engineering, or technology field in college. 2016 Issue

The numbers of high school … » More …

Impact Report: Youth Advocates for Health

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Youth Advocates for Health Download as PDF YA4-H! By The Numbers

Teen Teachers reported overall increases in healthy eating behaviors:

100% reported increased effective communication skills/abilities. 91% reported possessing teaching skills and abilities. 71% reported eating more vegetables. 71% reported eating more whole grains. 57% reported drinking more water. 57% reported eating fewer snack foods like chips, cookies, and candy. 2015 Issue

Despite research showing the benefits of healthy eating, obesity and overweight status in children and adolescents has tripled nationally in the past 30 years. In Washington, 11% of youth ages 10 to … » More …

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YF

Impact Report: State 4-H

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State 4-H Download as PDF Investing in the Future of Washington’s Youth By The Numbers Present in all 39 Washington counties. Engages nearly 80,000 youth annually. 7,000 trained adult volunteers. More than 1.5 million 4-H alumni. 92% of 4-H’ers attend post-secondary education. 44,500 youth engaged in school enrichment. 53,600 STEM Projects. 18,000 Citizenship Projects. 25,000 Healthy Lifestyle Projects. 2014 Issue

An effective democracy requires an active, engaged, and literate population. Regrettably, 26% of current Washington youth fail to graduate high school, and for minority youth that failure rate rises to more than 40%. Youth … » More …

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YF

4-H

The 4-H program reaches out to kids and their families to build skills for life. 4-H has a hundred different hands-on projects to offer.

Impact Report: 4-H Know Your Government

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4-H Know Your Government Download as PDF 2016 By The Numbers More than 220 high school students and 50 mentors attend the KYG Conference. 90% of participating youth, on average, reported significant gains in civic knowledge over the past 5 years. Since 1978, KYG has provided hands-on civic education. More than 3/4 of Washington counties are represented at the KYG Conference in any given year. The 4-H Know Your Government program empowers youth and adults to engage in leadership, citizenship, and life-skill development and application. Issue

Civics in America is in decline and it’s … » More …

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Impact Report: 4-H Teen Conference

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4-H Teen Conference

2014

By The Numbers

  • 90% of participants reported an increase in skills of communication, decision making, and accepting differences; plus marketable skills, control over personal goals, and self-responsibility.
  • 83% reported significant gains in exploring new careers, planning use of financial resources, and the use of sound judgment to set priorities.
  • 91.8% recognized skills they needed to get a job.
  • More than 2,500 students have attended the three-day Teen Conference since 2009, an average of 430 students each year.

Helping young people explore multiple and flexible pathways for a successful future

Issue

The last 10 years have been the most challenging decade in 50 years for young people to transition to adulthood, earn a degree, get a job, and stand on their own financially. Nearly 6.5 million U.S. teens and young adults neither attend school nor work. The employment rate for youth ages 16 to 19 has dropped 42% since 2000. In 2011, only 24% of 16- to 19-year-olds and 60% of 20- to 24-year-olds were employed. These youth are veering toward chronic unemployment as adults, and failing to gain the skills employers require in today’s job market. When young people lack connections to jobs and school, the government spends more to support them.

Yet, as young people struggle to gain experience and find any type of job, businesses cannot find the skilled workers they need to compete in the ever-changing, 21st Century economy. Part of the challenge is the gap between young people’s skills and the qualifications needed for available jobs. More than three-quarters of job openings in the next decade will require skills obtained beyond high school. McKindsey Global Institute predicts that by 2020, the United States will fall short of workers with college and graduate degrees by 1.5 million, but will have a surplus of nearly 6 million unemployed individuals who have not completed high school. In 2011, the National Center for Education Statistics reported Washington’s graduation rate was only 73.7%.

Response

To address these concerns, Washington State University Extension’s 4-H Youth Development Program organizes and sponsors the annual 4-H Teen Conference to assist youth in finding answers for their future. The 3-day event, held on the WSU Pullman campus, focuses on identifying post-secondary educational options, exploring careers, and developing life skills, including workforce preparation. More than 60 workshops connect youth to educational and employment skills and options, provide support for transitioning from high school to college, and help them strengthen skills to move into the work force. Activities, networking, and mentoring connect youth to education and training pathways that prepare them for jobs and economic success. Young people with academic know-how, technical skills, and essential “soft skills” to hold a job, can launch a career.

Conference objectives include:

  • Opportunities for teens of all backgrounds across Washington to come together to engage in educational programs applicable to their lives;

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Impact Report: Forest Youth Success

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Forest Youth Success Download as PDF By The Numbers Since 2002, more than $1 million in work value provided in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest.

In 2012:

$113,812 in work value. 1 mile of new boundary marked and cleared. 14 miles of trail work completed. 1 mile of new trail built. 14 acres of white pine pruning. 2 acres of invasive species removal; 2 acres surveyed. 19 miles of roadside brushing. Habitat enhancement, with 8 western pond turtles released. 4 acres of fuel treatment for prevention of forest fire. 9,500 trout released. 75 campsites … » More …

Impact Report: 4-H Challenge Course

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4-H Challenge Course

2014

By The Numbers

  • Since opening in 2009, the Challenge Course at Camp Long has engaged more than 7,000 students, and is expected to double that number in 2015.
  • Nearly 200 Challenge Course facilitators have been trained at Camp Long, and more than 400 facilitators have been trained system-wide.

Developing capable, caring, contributing citizens through research-based, guided adventure exploration and experiential learning.

Issue

Youth need more than knowledge to be successful and productive members of society—they also need social and emotional skills such as communication, leadership, cooperation, respect, trust, self-confidence, conflict resolution, decision-making, and problem-solving, frequently referred to as “emotional intelligence.” In today’s world of standardized testing and increasing pressure for academic success, students have fewer and fewer opportunities to develop these life skills (Source: “Using positive youth development to predict contribution and risk behaviors in early adolescence …” Int J Behav. Dev., vol. 31.). Currently, our country is experiencing a 30% to 40% dropout rate in our public education system. Nationally, the graduation rate for Caucasian students is only 78%; rates for minority students are lower still: 72% for Asian students, 55% for African-American students, and 53% for Hispanic students (Source: “Getting ahead by staying behind: An evaluation of Florida’s program to end social promotion.” Education Next 6).

Response

Washington State University Extension 4-H Youth Development is collaborating with Seattle Parks and Recreation to provide the residents of Seattle, King County, and beyond, the benefits of an educational partnership for school districts, non-profit organizations, institutions of higher education, businesses, and the public, resulting in the strengthening of community life. As a result, an outdoor Challenge Course has been established in an urban setting, at Camp Long in Seattle. The hands-on learning and experiential methodologies used in the program are the tools for re-engaging students in the learning process.

In active development for seven years, Phase One—a low course and two stand-alone high elements—was completed in September 2011. Phase Two—a hub-and-spoke high ropes course—was completed in 2012. This has allowed both the City of Seattle Parks and Recreation and WSU Extension 4-H to meet strategic goals of strengthening relationships and building a sense of community while promoting diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Camp Long provides a unique location, adjacent to a major bus route, making it accessible to all Seattle public school students. Open to the public, Camp Long also serves the largest school district in the state; Seattle Public Schools has 50,000 students in 95 schools.

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