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Coronavirus COVID-19

COVID-19 Advisory: WSU Extension is working to keep our communities safe. All Extension programming is being provided virtually, postponed, or canceled. Effective March 16, 2020, WSU Extension county offices and WSU Research & Extension Centers will be closed to the public. We are available via email, phone, and webconference.

WSU Extension, Island County

Connecting People, Resources and Knowledge

WSU Extension programs connect the people and communities of Island County with the knowledge base of Washington State University to promote quality of life and advance economic well-being through fostering inquiry, learning, and the application of research.

County Programs

WSU Extension Island County

is here to help get you through this crisis

Our office is currently being used by the Island County Office of Emergency Management, but the WSU staff is working from home and ready to serve you. Staff members will use both this website and Facebook to get information out to you. Your phone calls and emails will be answered and we will post information to help you with your education, nutrition, gardening, recycling, composting, and youth development needs.

COVID-19 Resources for Island County residents

Raising Healthy Pigs

Two piglets

Did you know that feeding pigs human food scraps has the potential to introduce several serious diseases? If you are raising pigs or have thought about raising pigs, learn about important health concerns facing pigs, including Garbage Feeding and African Swine Fever.

 

First Class of Island County Master Gardeners Trained Online

Presenting the Island County Master Gardener Class of 2020! These 16 dedicated gardeners began their training at the end of March, just when the quarantine began, so their entire training has been over Zoom. The first for the Washington State Master Gardener program. Now, they begin their 60 hour internship with the help of their mentors, also seen in the photo. Our volunteer efforts will be a bit different this summer and will follow state health safety guidelines. But the focus will still be on ways to teach sustainable gardening methods to other gardeners in Island County. Congratulations class!

If you would like to learn more about the Master Gardeners program in Island County, click here.

In the News

Land-grant mission steers WSU’s drive-in Wi-Fi partnership

Launched in late April, the Drive-In WiFi partnership has begun placing broadband access points at WSU’s county and tribal Extension centers, as well as schools, libraries, and community centers across the state.  WSU Extension, Island County now provides one of the first Drive-In Wi-Fi Hotspots being established by this program.  Island County residents may now access free broadband internet from the safety of their vehicle while parked in the WSU Extension, Island County parking lot.

READ MORE

Local Farmers Markets

Camano Island
Camano Farmers Market

Tuesdays, 3:00 – 7:00PM
June 2 – September 29
848 N. Sunrise Blvd
Facebook Page

Whidbey Island
Oak Harbor Farmers Market

Thursdays, 4:00 – 7:00PM
Mid-May – End of September
WA State Route 20 at Rotary Park
Facebook Page

 

Coupeville Farmers Market

Saturdays, 10:00 – 2:00PM
April 18 – October
788 NW Alexander St.
Facebook Page

 

 

South Whidbey Tilth Farmers Market

Sundays, 11:00 – 2:00PM
May – October
2812 Thompson Rd. Langley

Facebook Page

 

Bayview  Farmers Market

Saturdays, 10:00 – 2:00

Last Saturday in April – October
5603 Bayview Rd., Langley
Website

 

 

 

WSU Extension creates COVID‑19 food system information hub

Faculty and staff from WSU Extension’s Food Systems Program are working to better assist farm and food businesses, and consumers during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. By leveraging the existing networks of their team, the Food Systems Program created the COVID‑19 HUB, a compilation of online resources for food systems stakeholders across Washington.

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WSU Extension, Island County

406 N. Main Street
Coupeville, WA 98239
98239
(360) 639-6060

Title- Learning Opportunities photo of WSU Everett Campus

Accredited Programs through WSU

Pursue an undergraduate of advanced degree at Washington State University.  WSU offers 95 majors, 86 minors, and more than 100 in-major specializations — so your degree will reflect your interests and strengths.

Classes and Seminars

Find classes and seminars on a number of subjects.  Most are free.

Continuing Education

Find relevant continuing education (CE) for your profession.  More opportunities coming soon.

 

What educational opportunities does WSU offer?

Accredited Programs through WSU

Pursue an undergraduate of advanced degree at Washington State University.  WSU offers 95 majors, 86 minors, and more than 100 in-major specializations — so your degree will reflect your interests and strengths.

Classes and Seminars

Find classes and seminars on a number of subjects.  Most are free.

Continuing Education

Find relevant continuing education (CE) for your profession.  More opportunities coming soon.

Where can I get help with my Septic System

Island County government can help you with your septic system-

Septic Support

Island County Onsite Sewage (Septic) Program provides educational, advisory and permitting services for owners of septic systems, septic professionals and other parties.

Septic Training

Island County Septic 101 provides homeowners with a basic understanding of their onsite septic systems and best practices for operation and maintenance.

How your septic system works

excerpted from WSU Shore Stewards newsletters  

SepticHouse_guideline1All septic systems are composed of a septic tank and drainfield. Wastewater from your household flows into the septic tank, where heavy solids settle to the bottom of the tank and form a layer of sludge. Grease, toilet paper, and other light solids float to the top and form a scum layer. In between the sludge and the scum is a semi-clear layer of wastewater called effluent that does not include solids. As more wastewater enters the septic tank, the clear effluent layer of the tank flows through an outlet in the tank to the drainfield in your yard. The “good” bacteria living in the soil clean the wastewater by consuming harmful bacteria and viruses before this wastewater seeps into groundwater.

The “good” bacteria in the septic system do not completely decompose the sludge or scum layers, so the layers continue to grow, slowly filling up the tank over time. These layers will eventually need to be pumped out by a professional septic pumper. No special additives are necessary or recommended.

There are several types of septic systems, and it is important to understand what kind you have and the requirements for its specific maintenance and inspection. The most common type is the gravity system, which does not require a pump to operate. Others include the pressure distribution system, sand filter system, mound system, and aerobic treatment units such as the Glendon BioFilter system.

 

Can WSU Extension test my soil?

Soil Testing

To insure it does not compete with for-profit businesses, WSU does not provide soil analysis services.  There are many reputable commercial soil test companies available to test pH, nutrient and micro-nutrient levels.

For a list of area soil testing labs and detailed information about  soil properties and the testing process, visit this WSU site.

Note: WSU Extension, Island County can lend you the tools to take a proper soil test.  Contact us at stinger.anderson@wsu.edu or call (360) 639-6060

Taking a soil sample

Care must be taken to ensure that the soil sample truly represents the area being analyzed.  Soil tests are done on a sample that is only a tiny fraction of a field or garden plot. Soil treatment recommendations assume that data from the analysis of that tiny fraction represent the entire area to be treated.
If differences can be seen in the soil from various parts of the overall area to be sampled, each distinct subarea should be sampled separately. Differences in soil color or texture are obvious reasons for taking separate samples. Other reasons include differences in land slope, soil drainage, crop management history (different soil amendments or fertilizers), variations currently observed
in crop growth, or variations in the natural vegetation.  Each soil sample analyzed should be a combination of 5 to 10 sub-samples taken from the soil area of interest. The sub-samples should each be about the same amount of soil, and they should be mixed together thoroughly as they are collected. The final sample taken from this mixture is called a composite sample.  How large an area to sample? For home gardens, one sample that is representative of the garden plot is usually sufficient. For orchards or farms, even if no distinctly different soil types are noticeable, large areas should be subdivided into sample areas of 2–5 acres and sampled separately.

Is this a noxious weed?

Noxious Weeds

Undesirable non-native plants that have economic, ecological, or aesthetic implications as determined by the Island County Noxious Weed Control Board.

WSU Extension, Island County can help you identify plants on your property, even noxious weeds.  If you believe you or your neighbors have weeds determined noxious by the Island County Noxious Weed Control Board and need help controlling them, contact the Island County Noxious Weed Coordinator,

Seth Luginbill
Island County Noxious Weed Control website
Washington State Noxious Weed Control website

Epilobium hirsutum

Hairy willowherb

Class B Regulated Noxious Weed: Control Required

 

Should I be concerned about this insect?

Insect Identification


Azalea lace bug (Stephanitis pyrioides)

Insects play an important role in balancing our ecosystem.  But when they enter the home or munch on garden plants they can raise concerns.  WSU Extension, Island County can help you identify insects and provide help in selecting and applying the appropriate control if necessary.  insects can often be identified

Hortsense

Puyallup Lab

 

 

360) 639-6060

stinger.anderson@wsu.edu

What is wrong with my plant?

Whether you are looking for help with your favorite garden plant or with several acres of crops, WSU Extension, Island County has several ways to find answers to your plant questions and problems.

MG Hotline

Puyallup Lab

(360) 639-6060

Stinger.anderson@wsu.edu

Events

Thu 13

Island County Dog 4-H Leaders Committee Meeting

August 13 @ 8:30 PM - 9:30 PM
Tue 25

Island County 4-H Horse Leaders Zoom Meeting

August 25 @ 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Facebook

Title- Learning Opportunities photo of WSU Everett Campus

WSU Accredited Programs

Pursue an undergraduate of advanced degree at Washington State University.

Classes and Seminars

Find classes and seminars on a number of subjects.  Most are free.

Continuing Education

Find relevant continuing education (CE) for your profession.  More opportunities coming soon.