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The Pie Shoppe Garden at Greenbank Farm

Program Contact: Loren Imes
(360) 639-6059 • loren.imes@wsu.edu

pergola1At the north end of the Master Gardeners Demonstration Garden you’ll find an eclectic flower bed next to Whidbey Pies: The Pie Shoppe Garden. To build a garden of any size it helps to consider all herbaceous and woody plant options, including trees, shrubs, perennials, and annuals. You’ll find some of each type in this garden.
This area of the Master Gardeners Demonstration Garden is the windiest section of Whidbey Island. Each specimen in the Pie Shoppe Garden was selected because it is wind and drought tolerant. And, like the farm itself, the specimens you see here are very much like those found in gardens of the 1920s.

Like all multi-layered gardens, the Pie Shoppe Garden’s show is ever evolving. In late spring, early summer, you’ll see old familiars including Shasta Daisies, Peonies, Lupine, Columbine, Lilies, Irises and a variety of rose bushes. You’ll also find the wildly prolific Anenomes and Hardy Geraniums, the odd Clematis and Phlox. All these varietals are framed against the side of the barn where you’ll see a fabulously healthy Hops vine.

While colorful and whimsical three seasons out of four, it is voraciously invasive—we urge you to think twice before you introduce it to your own garden!

A little history:  This garden was designed to provide a lovely background for special events. Master Gardeners designed and built the pergola in 2002; then created planters and beds for a variety of herbs and perennials. Originally jasmine was planted to cover the pergola; however, it did not do well in the wind, so was moved to a more protected spot in the Cottage Garden, where it is thriving. Climbing roses have replaced the jasmine and should cover the pergola beautifully. Adjacent to the Pie Shoppe Garden is an allée planted with lilacs and laburnum.

Garden Tips

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Take into consideration the micro-climate of any area when selecting plants for it.

Replace plants that do not thrive in a given location with those that will.

Consider fragrance when planning a “special events” area in your garden.

For useful, and FREE, resources on flower bed gardening in our area, please visit the WSU Extension website: http://gardening.wsu.edu/flower-beds/