Skip to main content Skip to navigation

Suicide Prevention

Agriculture Can Be Stressful- You’re Not Alone

Coping with Excessive Stress

Agriculture is known to be a dangerous occupation full of potential stressors like weather, changing economic markets and machinery breakdowns. When these start to compound many farmers experience excessive stress, making it hard to move forward to positive solutions.

Due in part to the stresses faced in farming, agricultural workers have high rates of suicide. This loss of parents, siblings, children and spouses can be avoided – if you or someone you know is experiencing excessive stress or thoughts of suicide, please reach out to a confidential crisis support line.


WSU and the Agricultural Suicide Prevention Program is not a crisis center. If you are in need of immediate assistance, reach out to the National Suicide Prevention line, 1(800) 273-TALK (8255)

Additional Resources

If you’re thinking about suicide, are worried about a friend or loved one, or would like emotional support, the Lifeline network is available 24/7 across the United States.

Click Here to Learn More

Text from anywhere in the USA to text with a trained Crisis Counselor.

Every texter is connected with a Crisis Counselor, a real-life human being trained to bring texters from a hot moment to a cool calm through active listening and collaborative problem solving. All of Crisis Text Line’s Crisis Counselors are volunteers.

Leading Partners in Washington State

 

 

 

WSU Agricultural Suicide Prevention Pilot Program is funded through the State of Washington, Department of Health under the provisions of House Bill 2671. If you would like to contribute to the work of raising awareness about excessive stress and suicide prevention in agriculture, please reach out to WSU Skagit County Extension.

Washington State University